Lessons from Ruth

All of last semester, I had the privilege of walking my youth through the book of Ruth. It is a short story, but in it are simple and profound truths. Diving deep into its contents you will find themes of working faith, repentance, kindness, covenant faithfulness, loyalty, redemption, modesty, and integrity. In each of these, you will find encouragement for your soul and blessing to live the life of a godly man or woman.

Last Wednesday, I gave my students some concluding truths from the book of Ruth that I would like to share with you today.

God Works in the Ordinary, So Be Ordinary.Continue reading

Psalms and Hymns: Preach the Psalm Headings

The psalm is a hymn that is sung to an instrument, either a lyre or a psaltery. According to the spiritual or analogical sense, the poem is a contemplation of truth that happens not only in the mind but also in the music as with measured harmony. The psalm denotes actions that are done according to right reason; so as one sings he follows the way of an effective life; he sings who follows a life of contemplation.[1]

Didymus the Blind (ca. 313–398 AD) was an Alexandrian exegete whom Jerome admired. Origen influenced Didymus in his exegesis and theology.… Continue reading

A Corinthian Chronology

One of my favorite New Testament churches is the church at Corinth. They didn’t always get everything right, and they caused Paul a lot of trouble, but when viewed through his apostolic eyes they are rightly seen as a trophy of God’s grace (1 Cor. 1:4-9; 2 Cor. 7:16).

AWIB-ISAW: Corinth, Acrocorinth (VII) View from atop the acropolis of the city of Corinth, the acrocorinth. by Kathryn McDonnell copyright: Kathryn McDonnell (used with permission) photographed place: Korinthos (Corinth) [http://atlantides.org/batlas/corinthus-58-d2] Published by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World as part of the Ancient World Image Bank (AWIB). Further information: [http://www.nyu.edu/isaw/awib.htm].

AWIB-ISAW: Corinth, Acrocorinth (VII)
View from atop the acropolis of the city of Corinth, the acrocorinth. by Kathryn McDonnell
copyright: Kathryn McDonnell (used with permission)
photographed place: Korinthos (Corinth) [http://atlantides.org/batlas/corinthus-58-d2]
Published by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World as part of the Ancient World Image Bank (AWIB). Further information: [http://www.nyu.edu/isaw/awib.htm].

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Reprise: You’re Using It Wrong: Mark 12:41-44

If you have been around the church for any length of time, odds are you Zeferino_da_Costa_The_widows_mite-largehave heard someone say that you need to give sacrificially to the church, just like the widow who gave her last two mites.

This widow of course is the widow from Mark 12:41-44 (cf Lk 21:1-4) who puts two small copper coins into the treasury collection box at the temple, while others are putting in great sums. Jesus says that she gave more than all of the others because she gave out of her poverty, and He did say that she gave all she had.… Continue reading

Christmas: Another Proof for Premillennial Eschatology

The manifold proofs for a premillennial understanding of biblical eschatology are extensive. Great books over the last 50 or so years have been written to show that the Bible does1 indeed teach a pre-tribulational, premillennial eschatology. To deny this truth is to have a presupposition already in place for which you refuse to give up (e.g., “I believe in reformed theology, therefore I am Amillennial in my eschatology”). With that said, I believe the Christmas story is yet another proof (yes, proof!) of a premillennial understanding of biblical eschatology.

How do I arrive at that? Simply, I read the Christmas account as presented by Luke.… Continue reading