Pursuits More Important Than Politics (Reprise)

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Yesterday was yet another election day in the United States; a day when a healthy percentage of the American population visited their designated polling places to lend their voice to decide who will lead and represent our states, for the next couple of years at least.  (Or, they mailed in their ballots weeks ago, which I wish I would have done, but didn’t.)

I wrote this post a couple of years ago on the day of our most recent Presidential election.  I stand by it today, and offer it to you once again, in hope that it will help Christians in some small way to stay focused on things that are most important concerning this life, namely, things that concern eternity and the life to come.… Continue reading

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Reprise: Why I’m Apolitical

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After a very surreal week where I learned a new appreciation of the bravery of and God’s grace to Christians, especially pastor’s wives, in places where the church is persecuted I can think of no better post to share than one I wrote the day before the last presidential election, that was published the day after the last presidential election. And I would add, if you are not praying in accordance with 1 Timothy 2:1-2, now is the time to start.

Voting is over. The polls are closed, most of the votes counted, and Lord willing the president elect clearly identified, and our path forward as a nation made clear.… Continue reading

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Defending the Accused

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I wanted to write and publish this a few weeks ago, but didn’t want it teaming with the other plethora of emotional reactions to current events. Stressful and high emotional events do not serve as the best time for research and cognitive change. A friend once said, “Don’t learn theology of trials during the trial, but before the trial.” The best time to learn combat tactics is during the preparation time, allowing practice to hone those skills, not introduce them. The amount of public accusations levied recently highlights the need for God fearers to act appropriately, being in line with God’s Word.… Continue reading

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Peace-Loving Believers in an Age of Violence, Part 3 (Final)

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Three fairly significant biblical examples appear to support a believer’s participation in the military:[1]

  • Jesus’s approval of a king who waged war against wicked people (Matthew 21:33–41).
  • In Luke 3:14 John did not command them to resign from military service, but to be content in that position with its wages. Their behavior was to be just and honest — even while remaining soldiers.
  • In John 18:36 Jesus stated that it would have been proper for His disciples to defend His kingdom with swords if it had been an earthly kingdom.

In addition, New Testament writers employ a variety of military metaphors to describe the character of the believer:[2] the armor of God (Ephesians 6:10–20), being a “good soldier” (2 Timothy 2:3–4), and waging spiritual warfare (2 Corinthians 10:1–6).… Continue reading

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Peace-Loving Believers in an Age of Violence, Part 2

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Just war advocates normally base their stance upon passages revealing the divine origin and approval of government and its functions. Romans 13:1–7 forms the anchoring text for developing their view of governmental authority in the lives of Christians. The apostle Paul represents the government as a divinely constituted authority (vv. 1, 2). Hodge argues that

It was to Paul a matter of little importance whether the Roman emperor was appointed by the senate, the army, or the people; whether the assumption of the imperial authority by Caesar was just or unjust, or whether his successors had a legitimate claim to the throne or not.

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