Biblical Genealogies: A Sample Meditation

Our previous blog post (March 2) discussed the purposes for biblical genealogies. Now, please read the genealogy found in 1 Chronicles 1:17–27,

    17 The sons of Shem: Elam, Asshur, Arpachshad, Lud, and Aram. And the sons of Aram: Uz, Hul, Gether, and Meshech. 18 Arpachshad fathered Shelah, and Shelah fathered Eber. 19 To Eber were born two sons: the name of the one was Peleg (for in his days the earth was divided), and his brother’s name was Joktan. 20 Joktan fathered Almodad, Sheleph, Hazarmaveth, Jerah, 21 Hadoram, Uzal, Diklah, 22 Obal, Abimael, Sheba, 23 Ophir, Havilah, and Jobab; all these were the sons of Joktan.

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Biblical Genealogies: Begetting a Devotional Reading

You’ve heard it and maybe even said it yourself, “When I get to a genealogy in my Bible reading, I just skip it.” Genealogies (lists of names telling who is related to whom) can be boring and intimidating—especially if you have to read all those hard-to-pronounce names aloud for someone else to hear. However, Paul did not exclude the biblical genealogies when he wrote, “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:16–17 esv).… Continue reading

Getting Back Up: Remaining Up

Picture 1The aim of the “Getting Back Up” series has been to help those who are experiencing a severely broken relationship with God and are now eager, passionate—even desperate—to get right with Him.

The first five posts have dealt with how to properly think about and deal with personal sin God’s way. Getting to that point requires regular and humble examination to see the extent of one’s sin again an infinitely holy God.

But what happens when a believer truly repents and experiences the restoring work of God in their life?  What is the next step in order to stay up?  … Continue reading