“I Am Your God”–Whom Do We Serve?

Share
Share

slide_jer-7_23In Leviticus 26:12–13 God declares, “I will also walk among you and be your God, and you shall be My people. I am the LORD your God who brought you out of the land of Egypt . . .” (NASU). The middle two phrases present an expression of the covenant relationship between the Lord and His people. That relationship includes His personal presence (“I will walk among you”). This excludes any detached or aloof relationship. The divine title Immanuel (“God with us”) expresses such a close relationship.

For many Bible readers, biblical covenants seem like legal technicalities couched in ancient stipulations.… Continue reading

Share

A Century-Later Reflection

Share
Share

As I stated in my last post, I have been teaching though the Bible, a book-at-a-time, each week the next book. I want to give my youth a flavor of the whole story of the Bible, as well as show them that each book is relevant to their lives because God is unchanging in His Person, Work, and Standard.

In my last post I specifically wrote about Jonah and a few reflections. Today, I would like to give a few reflections from the follow-up prophet, Nahum.

Before my observations, I am sure that most (if not the vast majority) have no clue what Nahum is about.… Continue reading

Share

Continuity: Old Testament Truth in New Testament Clothing

Share
Share

One of the benefits of getting older consists of gaining perspective, being able to put the past into its proper place in order to better understand the present. Fifty-four years of studying the Bible also has its benefits—primarily in more clearly understanding the continuity that exists between the Old and New Testaments. As I was reading through the Bible this past year, Isaiah 62:5 (“as the bridegroom rejoices over the bride, so shall your God rejoice over you”)[1] called to mind the picture in Revelation 21:2 when John beheld the New Jerusalem descending from heaven “prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.” The association led me to contemplate God’s own joy with that city—especially with its inhabitants.… Continue reading

Share